Net Price at Private Nonprofit Four-Year Institutions by Published Tuition and Fees and Income, 2011-12

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In 2011-12, full-time dependent students from the lowest income quartile paid average net tuition and fees, after grant aid, of $11,300 in the for-profit sector, compared to $2,530 at the lowest-price and $9,860 at the highest-price nonprofit institutions.

Figure 2014_15A: Published and Net Prices of Full-Time Dependent Students at Private Nonprofit Four-Year Institutions, by Tuition and Fees and Family Income, 2011-12

Published and Net Prices of Full-Time Dependent Students at Private Nonprofit Four-Year Institutions, by Tuition and Fees and Family Income, 2011-12

Notes & Sources 

NOTES: Family income quartiles are based on all dependent undergraduate students across all sectors. Lowest: less than $30,000; second: $30,000 to $64,999; third: $65,000 to $105,999; highest: $106,000 or higher. Total grant aid includes veterans’ benefits. Includes full-time undergraduate students who were U.S. citizens or permanent residents.

SOURCE: NCES, National Postsecondary Student Aid Study, 2012.

  • Average grant aid for students from families with incomes below $30,000 covers over three-quarters of published tuition and fees at private nonprofit colleges and universities in all price categories.
  • Particularly for low-income students, the differences in the net prices of institutions in different tuition categories are smaller than the differences in published prices.
  • At private nonprofit institutions with published tuition and fees of $36,421 or higher in 2011-12, average prices net of grant aid from all sources ranged from $9,860 for dependent students from the lowest family income quartile to $29,110 for those from the highest income quartile.
  • At private nonprofit institutions with published tuition and fees of $22,104 or lower in 2011-12, average prices net of grant aid from all sources ranged from $2,530 for dependent students from the lowest family income quartile to $8,820 for those from the highest income quartile.